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ALS
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

ALS, or Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting, leading to difficulty speaking, swallowing, and breathing. ALS is a progressive disease, meaning that it worsens over time.

What is ALS?

ALS, or Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting, leading to difficulty speaking, swallowing, and breathing. ALS is a progressive disease, meaning that it worsens over time.


The exact cause of ALS is unknown, but there is evidence to suggest that a combination of genetic and environmental factors may play a role. There is also evidence to suggest that the disease is caused by a combination of genetic mutations and environmental exposures. The hallmark of ALS is the death of nerve cells (neurons) that control movement, leading to muscle weakness, wasting, and eventual paralysis.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of ALS can vary, but typically develop gradually and worsen over time. Common early symptoms include:

  • Muscle weakness or stiffness, especially in the arms and legs

  • Tripping or falling, due to weakened muscles.

  • Twitching or cramping of muscles

  • Difficulty speaking or swallowing.

  • Weakness in the tongue, face, or throat

As the disease progresses, other symptoms may develop, including:

  • Breathing difficulties and eventual respiratory failure

  • Paralysis of the limbs and torso

  • Loss of the ability to use the arms and legs

  • Difficulty with speaking, swallowing, and eating

  • Changes in mood or behavior

It's important to note that not everyone with ALS will experience all of these symptoms, and the progression of the disease can vary greatly from person to person. If you suspect you may have ALS, it's important to see a doctor, who can help diagnose and manage your symptoms.

Environmental Factor in ALS

Several environmental factors have been associated with an increased risk of developing ALS, including:

Exposure to toxins: Exposure to heavy metals, pesticides, and other toxins has been linked to an increased risk of ALS.

Smoking: Smoking has been linked to an increased risk of ALS, and smokers are more likely to develop the disease than non-smokers.

Military service: Military veterans are at a slightly higher risk of developing ALS, likely due to exposure to environmental toxins and other factors.

Traumatic brain injury: Traumatic brain injury has been linked to an increased risk of ALS, although the exact mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet fully understood.

Viral infections: Some studies have suggested that certain viral infections may increase the risk of ALS, although more research is needed to fully understand the link between viruses and the disease.

It's important to note that while these factors may be associated with an increased risk of ALS, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Most people with ALS do not have any known risk factors, and the exact cause of the disease is still not fully understood.

 

Viral infections in ALS

There is some evidence to suggest that viral infections may play a role in the development of ALS, although the exact mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet fully understood. Some studies have suggested that certain viruses, such as the poliovirus, may increase the risk of ALS, but more research is needed to confirm these findings.

In some cases, ALS may develop after a viral infection, but it is not clear whether the virus directly causes the disease or whether it is a result of the body's immune response to the virus. Some studies have also suggested that certain viral infections may trigger an autoimmune response, leading to the destruction of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

It is important to note that while the link between viral infections and ALS is an area of active research, the vast majority of people with ALS do not have a history of viral infections, and the disease is likely caused by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. If you have concerns about the potential role of viral infections in your risk of developing ALS, it is best to speak with your doctor.

 

Exposure to toxins in ALS

Exposure to certain toxins has been linked to an increased risk of developing ALS. Some studies have suggested that exposure to heavy metals, such as lead and mercury, may increase the risk of the disease. Other studies have found an association between exposure to pesticides and an increased risk of ALS.

It is important to note that while these exposures may be associated with an increased risk of ALS, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Most people with ALS do not have a history of exposure to toxins, and the exact cause of the disease is still not fully understood.

If you have concerns about your exposure to toxins and your risk of developing ALS, it is best to speak with your doctor. Your doctor can help you assess your risk and recommend steps to reduce your exposure to toxins in your environment. Additionally, it is important to take steps to protect your health and reduce your exposure to toxins by following recommended guidelines for safe use of pesticides, avoiding exposure to heavy metals, and reducing your exposure to other harmful substances in the environment.

Toxification and genetic toxicity are important areas of study, as they can have significant impacts on human health and the environment. By focusing on the outcome of toxification and genetic toxicity, BodyScience plays a crucial role in understanding and mitigating the effects of toxic substances and environmental factors on human health and well-being.


Toxification refers to the process by which toxic substances accumulate in the body, leading to negative health effects. Genetic toxicity refers to the potential for toxic substances to damage DNA and cause genetic mutations, which can increase the risk of developing certain diseases or conditions.


By studying the outcome of toxification and genetic toxicity, you can gain valuable insights into the mechanisms by which toxic substances impact human health and the environment, and identify potential interventions to prevent or mitigate these effects. This information can help to inform policies and practices aimed at promoting public health and environmental sustainability.
 

Genetic Mutations in ALS

Several genetic mutations have been linked to an increased risk of developing ALS. Some of the most well-known genetic mutations associated with ALS include:

SOD1 mutations: Mutations in the SOD1 gene have been linked to a small proportion of familial ALS cases.

TARDBP mutations: Mutations in the TARDBP gene have been linked to a small proportion of familial ALS cases.

C9orf72 mutations: Mutations in the C9orf72 gene are the most common cause of familial ALS, accounting for approximately 40% of cases.

FUS mutations: Mutations in the FUS gene have been linked to a small proportion of familial ALS cases.

It is important to note that while these genetic mutations have been linked to an increased risk of ALS, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Most people with ALS do not have a known genetic mutation, and the disease is likely caused by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors.

If you have a family history of ALS or other neurological conditions, it may be useful to speak with a genetic counselor to assess your risk of developing the disease. A genetic counselor can help you understand the genetic factors that may contribute to your risk of developing ALS, and help you make informed decisions about your health and your family's health.

 

What is the reason cells die in ALS?

In ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), the nerve cells responsible for controlling muscle movement (motor neurons) gradually degenerate and die. The exact reason why these cells die is not yet fully understood, but there are several theories as to why this occurs.

One theory is that there is a problem with the nerve cells' energy metabolism, leading to an accumulation of toxic substances that damage the cells. Another theory is that the nerve cells are subjected to oxidative stress, leading to the accumulation of damaged proteins that trigger the death of the cells.

It is also thought that genetic mutations and environmental factors may interact to cause the death of motor neurons in ALS. Some studies have suggested that the abnormal accumulation of proteins within the nerve cells may trigger a destructive process that leads to the death of the cells.

Finally, some studies have suggested that inflammation may play a role in the death of motor neurons in ALS. This theory is based on the observation that many people with ALS have an increased level of inflammation in the brain and spinal cord, and that anti-inflammatory drugs may help slow the progression of the disease.

In conclusion, the exact reason why nerve cells die in ALS is still not fully understood, and more research is needed to determine the underlying mechanisms of the disease.

 

Heavy metals influence on ALS

Exposure to heavy metals, such as lead and mercury, has been linked to an increased risk of developing ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Some studies have suggested that exposure to heavy metals may cause oxidative stress and the accumulation of toxic substances that damage the nerve cells responsible for controlling muscle movement.

However, it is important to note that while exposure to heavy metals has been linked to an increased risk of ALS, most people with the disease do not have a history of heavy metal exposure. Additionally, the exact role of heavy metals in the development of ALS is still not fully understood, and more research is needed to determine the precise mechanisms involved.

If you have concerns about your exposure to heavy metals and your risk of developing ALS, it is best to speak with your doctor. Your doctor can help you assess your exposure to heavy metals and recommend steps to reduce your exposure to these substances. Additionally, it is important to take steps to protect your health and reduce your exposure to heavy metals by following recommended guidelines for safe use of products that contain heavy metals, such as lead and mercury.

 

Why is ALS known as Lou Gehrig's disease?

ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is sometimes referred to as "Lou Gehrig's disease" after the famous baseball player Lou Gehrig, who was diagnosed with the condition in 1939. Gehrig was a legendary player for the New York Yankees and was widely regarded as one of the best players of his time. After his diagnosis, Gehrig retired from baseball and made a famous speech in which he declared himself the "luckiest man on the face of the earth."

Gehrig's diagnosis and subsequent death from ALS brought public attention to the disease and helped to raise awareness of the condition. Over the years, ALS has become synonymous with Gehrig's name, and the term "Lou Gehrig's disease" is now commonly used to refer to the condition.

It is important to note that while the term "Lou Gehrig's disease" is widely recognized and used, it is still officially referred to as ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). The use of the term "Lou Gehrig's disease" helps to raise awareness of the condition and serves as a reminder of the impact that this disease can have on individuals and their families.

What foods are known to increase the risk of ALS?

There is limited scientific evidence linking specific foods to an increased risk of developing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). However, some studies have suggested that a diet high in processed foods, red meat, and sugar may increase the risk of ALS.

On the other hand, a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains has been associated with a lower risk of developing ALS. Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in foods such as fatty fish and nuts, have also been shown to have a protective effect against ALS.

It is important to note that the relationship between diet and ALS risk is complex and not fully understood. While making dietary changes may not prevent or cure ALS, a balanced and healthy diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and limits processed foods, red meat, and sugar, is likely to provide overall health benefits and may help reduce the risk of other chronic diseases.

 

It is important for individuals to consult with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian before making significant dietary changes, especially for those with a personal or family history of ALS or other health conditions. They can help to provide personalized recommendations and ensure that dietary changes are safe and appropriate for each individual's needs and health status.

Is ALS equally common among men and women?

No, ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is more commonly diagnosed in men than in women. The exact reason for this difference is not known, but studies suggest that there may be a genetic and/or hormonal factor involved. On average, men are diagnosed with ALS at a younger age and have a faster progression of the disease compared to women. However, it is important to note that ALS can affect both men and women of any age, race, and ethnic background.

Is ALS related to age?

Yes, age is one of the risk factors for developing ALS. ALS most commonly occurs in people between the ages of 40 and 70, with the average age of onset being 55. Although, it can occur in younger and older individuals as well. The incidence of ALS increases with age, and it is more prevalent in people over 60 years old. However, it is important to note that ALS is not a normal part of aging, and the exact cause of the disease is not well understood.

Can ALS be inherited?

In some cases, ALS can be inherited and caused by genetic mutations passed down from one generation to another. This type of ALS is known as familial ALS (FALS) and represents 5-10% of all ALS cases. In FALS, multiple family members may develop ALS over several generations.

However, the majority of ALS cases (90-95%) are classified as sporadic ALS, meaning there is no clear inheritance pattern and no known genetic cause. Environmental and lifestyle factors, such as exposure to toxins, and mutations that occur spontaneously, may contribute to the development of sporadic ALS.

It is important to note that having a family history of ALS does not necessarily mean that an individual will develop the disease, and conversely, most people with ALS do not have a family history of the disease.

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The BodyScience Approach

Introducing the Mito-E Program and the next generation MyoRepair Program by BodyScience.

L'approccio BodyScience

 

Presentazione del programma Mito-E di BodyScience e del nostro programma MyoRepair di nuova generazione. 

 

I programmi BodyScience Mito-Ecombinano terapie mirate progettate per ripristinare l'efficienza mitocondriale (Mito-E) affrontando gli scavenger di energia mitocondriale sottostanti come virus, muffe, metalli pesanti e sostanze chimiche mentre contemporaneamente costruiscono e ripristinano i muscoli con MyoRepair. 

 

Incorporiamo terapie che hanno dimostrato clinicamente di funzionare nelle persone con disturbi neurodegenerativi e le impilano per il miglior effetto sinergico. I trattamenti sono personalizzati. Il nostro sistema di classificazione dei pazienti approfondito collega l'insorgenza e la progressione dei sintomi unici con le esposizioni specifiche per creare la combinazione di trattamenti più adatta a te. 

Abbiamo assistito a un livello completamente nuovo di cambiamento nei pALS che sono venuti da tre settimane o più.

Che cos'è la chimica medica/medicina cellulare?

 

Siamo un istituto medico funzionale completo specializzato in chimica medica, che è l'area della medicina cellulare che mira alla riparazione cellulare. Trattiamo tutti i tipi di disturbi neurodegenerativi e ci concentriamo in particolare sulla SLA.

 

Come ponte tra la scienza pura e la pratica della medicina, utilizziamo alcune delle terapie più promettenti, quelle che mostrano i migliori benefici, e le impiliamo in una combinazione unica per ogni persona.  Poiché la maggior parte delle malattie i disturbi derivano da danni che si verificano a livello cellulare, il nostro approccio è volto a ripristinare l'efficienza cellulare, riparare lo stress ossidativo e migliorare la neuroprotezione. Comprendiamo l'urgenza di trovare soluzioni e offrire trattamenti che ottengano risultati! Guarda le storie dei nostri pazienti per saperne di più. 

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Common Questions

Below are the most common questions we get about our ALS Program

How do I register for the program?
To enroll in the program, please visit our registration page using the link below.

ALS Registration


Why is a videoconference health discovery session necessary? (Disclaimer: Click Here)

The Health Discovery Session is an enlightening conversation led by our Scientific Director for individuals seeking guidance on their health and well-being. Its aim is to gather vital information regarding the individual's health background, current condition, and any health-related concerns or objectives they may have in mind.

Throughout this session, our Scientific Director may explore the individual's lifestyle, dietary habits, exercise routines, medical history, and any symptoms or health issues they may currently be dealing with. This information equips us with a comprehensive understanding of their distinct health circumstances, which is pivotal for devising a customized plan to assist them in achieving their health goals.

It's worth emphasizing that the videoconference is not designed for procedural training or devising remote treatment plans. Instead, its primary role is to function as a health discovery session, ensuring the safety and efficacy of the treatment. Consequently, we kindly request that you have your medical history and list of medications readily accessible for the session.


The videoconference is available for patients and their family members and is conducted exclusively in English. If needed, please arrange for a translator during your visit to our clinic. While our on-site staff can communicate in both English and Spanish, all health discovery session instructions are provided in English.


The cost of the videoconference is $350, and the $350.00 consultation fee applies to sessions with patients and their families, lasting for one hour. A $1,200.00 health discovery charge is incurred when a practitioner, clinician, or doctor joins the call to address questions, concerns, or provide guidance on the next steps.


What are the treatment costs?
The cost of treatment varies depending on the specific type of treatment you receive, the standard treatment plan is:
Mito E Plus Program: $7,500 - $8,500 per week, this includes all the medications needed during the week.
Please note that this price does not include any specialized tests (such as Tickborne or Heavy Metal Testing) or additional therapies (such as SOT or Pellets).

Is accommodation provided at the clinic?

No, our clinic operates on an outpatient basis. Patients come in the mornings for their treatments and can leave once their scheduled treatments are finished, usually in the early afternoon.

Do you provide Stem Cell Therapy?

YES.. Stem cell (SC) therapy is considered one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for ALS. With this therapy, various pathogenic mechanisms could be targeted to slow the progression of the disease.  CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Who is not eligible for this program?

Our therapy encompasses both intravenous (IV) and localized injections. It's important to note that individuals with a history of coagulation issues, those currently using blood thinners, and individuals with uncontrolled or elevated blood pressure may not be appropriate candidates for this therapy. We kindly ask that you include this information in your intake form and discuss it during your health discovery session.


What are the weekly program options?
Our Mito-E programs combine targeted therapies designed to enhance Mitochondrial Efficiency (Mito-E). This approach addresses underlying factors such as viruses, mold, heavy metals, and chemicals while simultaneously focusing on muscle restoration with MyoRepair.

 

How long should I plan to stay for treatment?

To optimize the treatment's efficacy, we conduct a personalized assessment of each individual's ALS condition. This assessment takes into account factors such as the type and progression of ALS, its onset, and its rate of advancement. The duration of your initial treatment plays a pivotal role in shaping your subsequent treatment plan.

The length of your first treatment session has a direct impact on the course of action that follows. In essence, the longer you stay during your initial visit and the more we can accomplish in terms of muscle and cellular repair, the better prepared you will be to resist the progression of ALS over time.


Is this a one-time treatment?

Our approach centers around cellular repair and muscle building, harnessing a range of advanced technologies. Typically, patients revisit every 4 to 6 months. Nevertheless, the frequency of your return visits is contingent upon the specifics of your ALS condition and its rate of progression.


How soon can I expect to see results?

Our program is not a rapid solution; it necessitates dedication and patience for muscles to strengthen and neurons to reestablish connections. Our primary aim is to put a halt to the progression, shifting from a negative progression state to a neutral one. Once this milestone is achieved, our emphasis shifts to advancing your condition, improving mobility, function, and your overall quality of life.


Is previous medical information relevant?

Certainly. Prior to your initial consultation, we kindly ask that you fill out an intake form and submit any relevant medical records you may have. In alignment with our holistic approach to tackling the underlying factors contributing to your ALS-related health concerns, we advise specific laboratory tests before commencing our program.


Do you accept insurance?

Regrettably, our program is not covered by insurance. We strongly recommend making use of your insurance coverage for as many laboratory tests as possible.

Payment Details:
All treatment fees must be settled in their entirety at the time when medication is ordered, which is typically upon confirming your start date. If your treatment start date is more than two weeks away, a $1,000 deposit is necessary to secure your spot. The remaining balance is due on the first Monday of your treatment. We accept payments in cash, major credit cards, and wire transfers. Please be aware that this program does not offer refunds.

What should I bring?
For your visit, please bring hard copies of all medical records, even if you have previously emailed or faxed them. Additionally, prepare a list of all medications and supplements you currently take, including their dosages. Include details about any medical treatments you've received in the past three years and information on any trials you've participated in.
 

​What should I wear?

We ask that you wear shorts (athletic – the shorter the better) and a button-down shirt for men or sports bra for women. If you use a cane or walker, make sure to bring them.


Video Conference Disclaimer

Please be aware that all information shared during our consultations is intended exclusively for general educational and informational purposes. It is vital to understand that this information should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to serve as such.

Please note that the information we provide is not exhaustive, and it does not encompass all medical conditions, disorders, health-related issues, or their respective treatments. We strongly recommend that you always consult with a qualified healthcare provider, such as your physician, to evaluate the suitability of this information for your specific circumstances. If you have inquiries about a medical condition or a treatment plan, it is essential to seek guidance from a healthcare professional.

Our provided information has not been evaluated or endorsed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and may not necessarily be founded on scientific evidence from authoritative sources. The statements made in this context are not intended to diagnose, treat, mitigate, prevent, or cure any medical condition or disease. Therefore, you agree not to employ any information from our consultations, including product descriptions or customer testimonials, to diagnose or treat health concerns or to prescribe medications or treatments.

Please understand that any customer testimonials showcased on our website represent the personal opinions of individuals, and the results they have achieved are specific to their individual experiences. Your results may differ, and it is crucial to recognize that these testimonials do not replace professional medical advice. Always consult with your physician or healthcare provider before making changes to your diet or embarking on an exercise regimen.

In view of the foregoing, you acknowledge and agree that we do not accept liability and assume no responsibility for the information contained on our website or for any reliance placed upon it. We shall not be held accountable for any direct, indirect, consequential, special, exemplary, or other damages resulting from your use of the information found on our website.

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