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ALS - BodyScience Approach

How BS treats ALS
What is ALS
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The Top 3 Reasons Our Programs Work:

1. Clinical Expertise.

Our team has extensive experience treating neurodegenerative disease! 

Amy Jaramillo, Scientific Director, has spent over 20 years in the field neurology, neuro-genetics and neurodegenerative disease.  She has instructed in over a thousand neurosurgical cases in people suffering with neurodegenerative disease. 

Alex Ferro MD, Medical Director, has an extensive surgical background having performed complex surgeries for over 20 years. Dr. Ferro is able to perform injections in very vital but difficult to access areas which allows for unmatched clinical outcomes.

2. Purity in the Medications We Use.

Compounding pharmacies are a main-stay for many treatments but many clinics do not require their compounding pharmacies to have a sterile permit or to test for medication purity. Over 90% of compounding pharmacies nationwide do not test their medications for potency.  This is why results can be inconsistent and may not work. Given the speed and devastation of neurodegenerative disease, we only partner with pharmacies certified for sterility and we require purity levels of 99% or higher. We do NOT rely on compounding and instead use FDA approved products ensuring that heavy metal toxins are avoided.

3. Strategic Approach.

We are a team of medical scientists.  We employ a methodical and comprehensive approach to work through cellular autophagy and senescence.  Two critical components of our program are evaluation of the immune system’s role in neurodegenerative syndromes and restoration of areas triggering ongoing inflammation such as gut health. We strive to understand other body systems and work towards improving overall health such as hormonal and metabolic optimization, in particular glucose and energy metabolism. Being on the forefront of neurodegenerative diseases, we are up to date with the latest clinical trials and well versed in the newest and most advanced therapies. Our clinical staff are experts at knowing how medications work and which combination of therapies work best for specific conditions.

 

 

BodyScience pALS Programs: 

 

1. MyoRepair

MyoRepair is a technology that we developed for pALS and others with muscle atrophy disorders including Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and some forms of Muscular Dystrophy (MD).  MyoRepair is the process of providing important amino acids through intramuscular injection into muscles throughout the body. The amino acid formulation is commonly referred to as GAC, the amino acid ratio and pH is customized for each patient.  

2. Lingual Lift

Lingual Lift is a targeted treatment developed at BodyScience to restore strength and function in the tongue and adjacent muscles for improved speaking, swallowing and chewing.

 

3. BodyScience Mito-E (i.e. Mitochondrial Efficiency) with MyoRepair  

BodyScience Mito-E programs are designed to work synergistically with MyoRepair.  Building muscle and addressing the root cause of neurodegenerative diseases at the cellular level are the two fundamental steps in treating these disorders.  Unlocking the mitochondria and supporting other cellular structures including the peroxisomes and lysosomes is essential. When Mito-E and MyoRepair are combined the results are significantly more effective and longer lasting. The recommended minimum treatment time for optimal and long lasting results is 3-4 weeks.

Here are our Mito-E with MyoRepair Programs

1. BodyScience Mito-E General Program – for patients with neuromuscular degenerative disease. This cellular level treatment is targeted toward mitochondrial efficiency and restoring intra-cellular health.  It is comprised of a Regulatory T-cell support, targeted neuroprotection therapy, mitochondrial optimizers and neuro-antioxidants.

2. BodyScience Mito-E for Mold, Lyme or other Tick Born Disease, Viruses and other infectious agents – if you have ever been diagnosed with or exposed to mold, yeast (i.e. Candida), Lyme disease, viruses such as EBV, CMV, HSV, or Parvo this program starts with a comprehensive consultation individualized to address your specific infectious burden and devise a treatment plan which would best work for you.  See information on Molecular Medicine to learn about SOT therapy which is a separate treatment that can be added to this Mito E therapy.

 

3. BodyScience Mito-E for Heavy Metals – This is the program for individuals who have tested positive for or have been exposed to heavy metals. This protocol is also for the those who have worked in the metal or mining industry, lived close to coal mining burning facilities, used coal fireplaces extensively, or consumed foods high in metals such as fish.

4. BodyScience Mito-E for Chemical and/or Environmental Exposures – This is the program for individuals who have tested positive for or have been exposed to toxic chemicals such as organophosphates, glyphosates, fungicides, herbicides or pesticides. It is the protocol for those who have worked in agriculture, lived in industrial zones or areas known to have high levels of contamination such as coastal regions.

General Pricing

Mito-E Plus Program with or without MyoRepair $7500/wk

The Mito E Plus Program includes Polychromatic Light Therapy as well as medications and nebulized treatments. Each patients get a custome program depending on needs and priorities.      

For other procedures like Exosomes, Ketamine, SOT, etc  please call to request pricing.

Other services offered at BodyScience as a part of a comprehensive approach to treating ALS and other  neurodegenerative conditions include: nutritional counseling, physical therapy and customized orthotics, mental health support, occupational therapy, speech therapy.

What is ALS?

ALS, or Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting, leading to difficulty speaking, swallowing, and breathing. ALS is a progressive disease, meaning that it worsens over time.


The exact cause of ALS is unknown, but there is evidence to suggest that a combination of genetic and environmental factors may play a role. There is also evidence to suggest that the disease is caused by a combination of genetic mutations and environmental exposures. The hallmark of ALS is the death of nerve cells (neurons) that control movement, leading to muscle weakness, wasting, and eventual paralysis.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of ALS can vary, but typically develop gradually and worsen over time. Common early symptoms include:

  • Muscle weakness or stiffness, especially in the arms and legs

  • Tripping or falling, due to weakened muscles.

  • Twitching or cramping of muscles

  • Difficulty speaking or swallowing.

  • Weakness in the tongue, face, or throat

As the disease progresses, other symptoms may develop, including:

  • Breathing difficulties and eventual respiratory failure

  • Paralysis of the limbs and torso

  • Loss of the ability to use the arms and legs

  • Difficulty with speaking, swallowing, and eating

  • Changes in mood or behavior

It's important to note that not everyone with ALS will experience all of these symptoms, and the progression of the disease can vary greatly from person to person. If you suspect you may have ALS, it's important to see a doctor, who can help diagnose and manage your symptoms.

Environmental Factor in ALS

Several environmental factors have been associated with an increased risk of developing ALS, including:

Exposure to toxins: Exposure to heavy metals, pesticides, and other toxins has been linked to an increased risk of ALS.

Smoking: Smoking has been linked to an increased risk of ALS, and smokers are more likely to develop the disease than non-smokers.

Military service: Military veterans are at a slightly higher risk of developing ALS, likely due to exposure to environmental toxins and other factors.

Traumatic brain injury: Traumatic brain injury has been linked to an increased risk of ALS, although the exact mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet fully understood.

Viral infections: Some studies have suggested that certain viral infections may increase the risk of ALS, although more research is needed to fully understand the link between viruses and the disease.

It's important to note that while these factors may be associated with an increased risk of ALS, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Most people with ALS do not have any known risk factors, and the exact cause of the disease is still not fully understood.

 

Viral infections in ALS

There is some evidence to suggest that viral infections may play a role in the development of ALS, although the exact mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet fully understood. Some studies have suggested that certain viruses, such as the poliovirus, may increase the risk of ALS, but more research is needed to confirm these findings.

In some cases, ALS may develop after a viral infection, but it is not clear whether the virus directly causes the disease or whether it is a result of the body's immune response to the virus. Some studies have also suggested that certain viral infections may trigger an autoimmune response, leading to the destruction of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

It is important to note that while the link between viral infections and ALS is an area of active research, the vast majority of people with ALS do not have a history of viral infections, and the disease is likely caused by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. If you have concerns about the potential role of viral infections in your risk of developing ALS, it is best to speak with your doctor.

 

Exposure to toxins in ALS

Exposure to certain toxins has been linked to an increased risk of developing ALS. Some studies have suggested that exposure to heavy metals, such as lead and mercury, may increase the risk of the disease. Other studies have found an association between exposure to pesticides and an increased risk of ALS.

It is important to note that while these exposures may be associated with an increased risk of ALS, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Most people with ALS do not have a history of exposure to toxins, and the exact cause of the disease is still not fully understood.

If you have concerns about your exposure to toxins and your risk of developing ALS, it is best to speak with your doctor. Your doctor can help you assess your risk and recommend steps to reduce your exposure to toxins in your environment. Additionally, it is important to take steps to protect your health and reduce your exposure to toxins by following recommended guidelines for safe use of pesticides, avoiding exposure to heavy metals, and reducing your exposure to other harmful substances in the environment.

Toxification and genetic toxicity are important areas of study, as they can have significant impacts on human health and the environment. By focusing on the outcome of toxification and genetic toxicity, BodyScience plays a crucial role in understanding and mitigating the effects of toxic substances and environmental factors on human health and well-being.


Toxification refers to the process by which toxic substances accumulate in the body, leading to negative health effects. Genetic toxicity refers to the potential for toxic substances to damage DNA and cause genetic mutations, which can increase the risk of developing certain diseases or conditions.


By studying the outcome of toxification and genetic toxicity, you can gain valuable insights into the mechanisms by which toxic substances impact human health and the environment, and identify potential interventions to prevent or mitigate these effects. This information can help to inform policies and practices aimed at promoting public health and environmental sustainability.
 

Genetic Mutations in ALS

Several genetic mutations have been linked to an increased risk of developing ALS. Some of the most well-known genetic mutations associated with ALS include:

SOD1 mutations: Mutations in the SOD1 gene have been linked to a small proportion of familial ALS cases.

TARDBP mutations: Mutations in the TARDBP gene have been linked to a small proportion of familial ALS cases.

C9orf72 mutations: Mutations in the C9orf72 gene are the most common cause of familial ALS, accounting for approximately 40% of cases.

FUS mutations: Mutations in the FUS gene have been linked to a small proportion of familial ALS cases.

It is important to note that while these genetic mutations have been linked to an increased risk of ALS, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Most people with ALS do not have a known genetic mutation, and the disease is likely caused by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors.

If you have a family history of ALS or other neurological conditions, it may be useful to speak with a genetic counselor to assess your risk of developing the disease. A genetic counselor can help you understand the genetic factors that may contribute to your risk of developing ALS, and help you make informed decisions about your health and your family's health.

 

What is the reason cells die in ALS?

In ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), the nerve cells responsible for controlling muscle movement (motor neurons) gradually degenerate and die. The exact reason why these cells die is not yet fully understood, but there are several theories as to why this occurs.

One theory is that there is a problem with the nerve cells' energy metabolism, leading to an accumulation of toxic substances that damage the cells. Another theory is that the nerve cells are subjected to oxidative stress, leading to the accumulation of damaged proteins that trigger the death of the cells.

It is also thought that genetic mutations and environmental factors may interact to cause the death of motor neurons in ALS. Some studies have suggested that the abnormal accumulation of proteins within the nerve cells may trigger a destructive process that leads to the death of the cells.

Finally, some studies have suggested that inflammation may play a role in the death of motor neurons in ALS. This theory is based on the observation that many people with ALS have an increased level of inflammation in the brain and spinal cord, and that anti-inflammatory drugs may help slow the progression of the disease.

In conclusion, the exact reason why nerve cells die in ALS is still not fully understood, and more research is needed to determine the underlying mechanisms of the disease.

 

Heavy metals influence on ALS

Exposure to heavy metals, such as lead and mercury, has been linked to an increased risk of developing ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Some studies have suggested that exposure to heavy metals may cause oxidative stress and the accumulation of toxic substances that damage the nerve cells responsible for controlling muscle movement.

However, it is important to note that while exposure to heavy metals has been linked to an increased risk of ALS, most people with the disease do not have a history of heavy metal exposure. Additionally, the exact role of heavy metals in the development of ALS is still not fully understood, and more research is needed to determine the precise mechanisms involved.

If you have concerns about your exposure to heavy metals and your risk of developing ALS, it is best to speak with your doctor. Your doctor can help you assess your exposure to heavy metals and recommend steps to reduce your exposure to these substances. Additionally, it is important to take steps to protect your health and reduce your exposure to heavy metals by following recommended guidelines for safe use of products that contain heavy metals, such as lead and mercury.

 

Why is ALS known as Lou Gehrig's disease?

ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is sometimes referred to as "Lou Gehrig's disease" after the famous baseball player Lou Gehrig, who was diagnosed with the condition in 1939. Gehrig was a legendary player for the New York Yankees and was widely regarded as one of the best players of his time. After his diagnosis, Gehrig retired from baseball and made a famous speech in which he declared himself the "luckiest man on the face of the earth."

Gehrig's diagnosis and subsequent death from ALS brought public attention to the disease and helped to raise awareness of the condition. Over the years, ALS has become synonymous with Gehrig's name, and the term "Lou Gehrig's disease" is now commonly used to refer to the condition.

It is important to note that while the term "Lou Gehrig's disease" is widely recognized and used, it is still officially referred to as ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). The use of the term "Lou Gehrig's disease" helps to raise awareness of the condition and serves as a reminder of the impact that this disease can have on individuals and their families.

What foods are known to increase the risk of ALS?

There is limited scientific evidence linking specific foods to an increased risk of developing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). However, some studies have suggested that a diet high in processed foods, red meat, and sugar may increase the risk of ALS.

On the other hand, a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains has been associated with a lower risk of developing ALS. Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in foods such as fatty fish and nuts, have also been shown to have a protective effect against ALS.

It is important to note that the relationship between diet and ALS risk is complex and not fully understood. While making dietary changes may not prevent or cure ALS, a balanced and healthy diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and limits processed foods, red meat, and sugar, is likely to provide overall health benefits and may help reduce the risk of other chronic diseases.

 

It is important for individuals to consult with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian before making significant dietary changes, especially for those with a personal or family history of ALS or other health conditions. They can help to provide personalized recommendations and ensure that dietary changes are safe and appropriate for each individual's needs and health status.

Is ALS equally common among men and women?

No, ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is more commonly diagnosed in men than in women. The exact reason for this difference is not known, but studies suggest that there may be a genetic and/or hormonal factor involved. On average, men are diagnosed with ALS at a younger age and have a faster progression of the disease compared to women. However, it is important to note that ALS can affect both men and women of any age, race, and ethnic background.

Is ALS related to age?

Yes, age is one of the risk factors for developing ALS. ALS most commonly occurs in people between the ages of 40 and 70, with the average age of onset being 55. Although, it can occur in younger and older individuals as well. The incidence of ALS increases with age, and it is more prevalent in people over 60 years old. However, it is important to note that ALS is not a normal part of aging, and the exact cause of the disease is not well understood.

Can ALS be inherited?

In some cases, ALS can be inherited and caused by genetic mutations passed down from one generation to another. This type of ALS is known as familial ALS (FALS) and represents 5-10% of all ALS cases. In FALS, multiple family members may develop ALS over several generations.

However, the majority of ALS cases (90-95%) are classified as sporadic ALS, meaning there is no clear inheritance pattern and no known genetic cause. Environmental and lifestyle factors, such as exposure to toxins, and mutations that occur spontaneously, may contribute to the development of sporadic ALS.

It is important to note that having a family history of ALS does not necessarily mean that an individual will develop the disease, and conversely, most people with ALS do not have a family history of the disease.

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